COMMUNITY

.

Announcements.

Health.

Schools.

Achievements.

Staff Blog.

A & E.

Column-inch Collection.

Young Writers Project.

Book Reviews.

Food.  

Volunteers.

Town News

 

.

.

Leaf drop off planned for Nov. 1-2 at Airport Park

The eighth annual leaf collection weekend is scheduled for Nov. 1-2 at Airport Park in Colchester. Residents may drop off their leaves at no charge from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days.

Biodegradable paper bags, while not required, may be used to bag leaves. Plastic bags will not be accepted. Leaves and Halloween pumpkins may be dropped off, but no brush or large tree branches will be allowed.

The park is located on Airport Road in Colchester approximately one-half mile from the intersection with Porter’s Point Road. Members of the Conservation Commission will be on hand to direct traffic and answer questions.

The drop-off is sponsored by the Chittenden Solid Waste District in cooperation with the Conservation Commission and the Town of Colchester. Last year CSWD hauled 63.35 tons of leaves — seven loads in 40-cubic-yard containers — to Green Mountain Compost in Williston to turn into compost for retail sale.

.

Malletts Bay Boy Scouts learn and practice citizenship

Members of Den 6, Pack 655 Webelos pick up trash and put the garden to bed for the winter at Malletts Bay School on Oct. 17. Pictured from left to right: Jackson Callane, Ryan Bevins, Owen Loftus and leader Jeff Callane. PHOTO COURTESY JEFF CALLANE

Members of Den 6, Pack 655 Webelos pick up trash and put the garden to bed for the winter at Malletts Bay School on Oct. 17. Pictured from left to right: Jackson Callane, Ryan Bevins, Owen Loftus and leader Jeff Callane.
PHOTO COURTESY JEFF CALLANE

Members of Den 6, Pack 655 Webelos demonstrated their commitment to good citizenship and service learning on Oct. 17. Under the leadership of Jeff Callane, Jackson Callane, Ryan Bevins and Owen Loftus, the scouts braved the wind and rain to put the MBS School Garden to bed for the winter, and scoured the playground to clean up trash left behind by others. The school garden is planted and managed entirely by parent volunteers. The garden shares space with the Malletts Bay Outdoor Classroom, also built by parent volunteers in collaboration with University of Vermont students.

Later that week, the boys continued their citizenship education by visiting the Colchester School Board on Oct. 21. Scouts Blake Strickland, Jackson Callane, Charlie Walsh, Xander Walker Caleb Lavasseur, Brady Lavasseur, Geoffry DeBrosee and Ryan Bevins demonstrated exemplary behavior as they led the Pledge of Allegiance and learned more about school board operations. The students learned about the District’s drug and alcohol policy while in attendance at the meeting.

The Colchester School District’s mission states that we will “partner with our community to educate each of our students to become engaged, productive citizens who lead successful, balanced, and healthy lives.” This partnership is realized and enhanced with partners such as the Boy Scouts and our many parent volunteers.

.

Diaper Drive kicks off eighth year

Jason Fitzgerald, of Colchester, stands with more than 3,800 diapers collected so far for the eighth annual Diaper Drive. This year diapers will be collected at Dee Physical Therapy in South Burlington and Shelburne from Nov. 3-Dec. 22. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Jason Fitzgerald, of Colchester, stands with more than 3,800 diapers collected so far for the eighth annual Diaper Drive. This year diapers will be collected at Dee Physical Therapy in South Burlington and Shelburne from Nov. 3-Dec. 22.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Dee Physical Therapy, in Shelburne, is entering its eighth year in an effort to support the families of the Committee on Temporary Shelter by collecting and donating boxes of diapers. The Great Diaper Drive of 2014 is a growing effort that began in 2007 when Colchester resident Jason Fitzgerald, Dee PT Clinical Coordinator, met with the staff at C.O.T.S. and realized the unmet demand and abundant cost of disposable diapers. Since then, the diaper drive has run annually around the holidays to collect and donate diapers that will be put to use by infants and toddlers in temporary shelters.

This year, Fitzgerald was awarded the 2014 C.O.T.S. Business Hero Award which recognizes Dee PT for its role in community partnerships and collaborations throughout the state of Vermont. So far, they have donated over 120,000 diapers to the cause and with continued support, Dee PT hopes to exceed last year’s record of 27,000 diapers.

Anyone can contribute to the drive. There have been several anonymous donations in the past as well from people who have heard our story and been kind enough to contribute to the cause. There are two diaper drop off sites: Dee Physical Therapy at 23 San Remo Drive in South Burlington and 166 Athletic Drive in Shelburne. Diapers can be dropped off Monday through Thursday between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., and on Fridays between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m., beginning Nov. 3 and running through Dec. 22.

For more information email Jason at jasonfitzgerald@deept.com or call Dee Physical Therapy at 865-0010.

.

Lake Champlain Basin Program seeks local grant proposals

The Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP) is seeking proposals for local grants to support the implementation of the long term management plan for Lake Champlain, Opportunities for Action plan.lcbp.org.  The LCBP anticipates awarding more than 50 local grants totaling up to $650,000. Funding for these awards originates from the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and the National Park Service through agreements with the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission.

The Lake Champlain Basin Program’s 2014 Local Implementation Grant programs will include:

  • Pollution Prevention & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Grants (up to $20,000 per grant),
  • Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention Grants (up to $15,000 per grant),
  • Education and Outreach Grants (up to $7,500 per grant),
  • Organizational Support Grants (up to $4,000 per grant), and
  • Local Water Trail Development Grants (up to $7,500 per grant).

The deadline for submitting LCBP grant proposals is Nov. 5 at 4:30 p.m. Grant guidelines and applications for each category are found on the Lake Champlain Basin Program’s website at www.lcbp.org/about-us/grants-rfps/available-grants/.

For further information about these grant opportunities or to obtain hard copies of the guidelines and applications, contact the Lake Champlain Basin Program office, 54 West Shore Road, Grand Isle, VT 05458 or call at (802) 372-3213 or (800) 468-5227.

.

Regional horse contests prepare 4-H’ers for national competition

Representing Vermont in horse judging at the New England 4-H Horse Contests on Oct. 19 in Bennington, were (from left): Rachel Scibek, Colchester; Kassidy Wyman, Cambridgeport; Catherine Thrasher, Rupert; Kate Patenaude, Derby Line; Sarah Rogers, Grafton; and Kennedy Mitowski, Rutland. PHOTO COURTESY OF UVM EXTENSION 4-H

Representing Vermont in horse judging at the New England 4-H Horse Contests on Oct. 19 in Bennington, were (from left): Rachel Scibek, Colchester; Kassidy Wyman, Cambridgeport; Catherine Thrasher, Rupert; Kate Patenaude, Derby Line; Sarah Rogers, Grafton; and Kennedy Mitowski, Rutland.
PHOTO COURTESY OF UVM EXTENSION 4-H

Vermont was host to the New England 4-H Horse Contests held Oct. 19 to help 4-H’ers prepare for national competition.

The day-long event at Mount Anthony High School in Bennington and Bonnie Lea Farm in Williamstown, Mass., (horse judging) served as practice for Vermont 4-H club members who will compete next month at the Eastern National 4-H Horse Roundup in Louisville, Ky., an event that attracts competitors from 30 states. The competition was open to 4-H’ers from all six New England as well as New York and New Jersey.

In the communications contests, Kyle Scott of Milton placed fourth in public speaking. Holly Weglarz of Hartland was third in individual demonstration while Morgan Quimby, Underhill, and Ashley Scott, Milton, took second in team demonstration.

Vermont had two teams competing in the horse judging, quiz bowl and hippology contests. The A Team in each event consisted of the 4-H’ers who will compete at Roundup in Kentucky this November. The B Teams include individuals who placed high at various state horse events but who were not selected to represent Vermont at Roundup this year.

In the horse judging contest, scores were tallied both for individuals and teams for class placings and oral reasons.

Rachel Scibek, Colchester; Catherine Thrasher, Rupert; and Kassidy Wyman, Cambridgeport; represented Vermont on the A Team.

For overall high score, as well as the team class placings and oral reasons, the A Team came in third. Kassidy was second high individual overall and the third-place finisher in individual class placings.

The B Team, which finished fourth overall, was comprised of Kennedy Mitowski, Rutland; Katelyn Patenaude, Derby Line; and Sarah Rogers, Grafton. Team placings included first place in oral reasons and fourth in class placings. Katelyn took first in individual oral reasons.

In quiz bowl, the A Team, which included David Gringeri, West Haven; Kaelyn Jenny, Essex; Emma Pearson, North Hero; and Alexis Walker, Essex Junction, finished first. For individual high scores, Emma placed first and Kaelyn, second.

The B Team came in fourth. Team members were Betsy Coburn, Castleton; Beth McGranahan, Middletown Springs; and Brianna and Nichole Wardwell, both from Hartford.

Vermont also did well in hippology with the A Team taking first overall as well as in stations, team problem solving and the written phases of the competition. In the judging phase the team came in fourth.

Team members included Courtney Bronson, Shoreham (fourth in individual judging); Lexy Brooks, Whitehall, N.Y. (fourth overall and in individual written exam); Ruth Snow, Northfield, (fourth in individual stations) and Madison Wood, Concord, (first overall and in both the individual written exam and stations phase).

The B Team included Alexis Boyd, Fairfax; Gia Gould, South Burlington (fifth in individual judging); Lauren Whitehouse, Essex; and Lindsey Wood, Concord. The team placed fifth overall in competition with a fourth place in judging and stations and fifth place in both the written and team problem solving phases.

For more information the Vermont 4-H horse program and Eastern National 4-H Horse Roundup, Nov. 7-9, contact UVM Extension 4-H livestock educator Wendy Sorrell at wendy.sorrell@uvm.edu.

.

Horse owners sought for manure composting program

The Winooski Natural Resources Conservation District (WNRCD) recently received an Ecosystem Restoration Program (ERP) Grant from the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (VT DEC) to develop a horse manure composting program. WNRCD staff are expecting work with horse owners within the District (Chittenden County, Washington County and the towns of Orange, Williamstown, and Washington) to improve water quality conditions by preventing manure and manure runoff from entering local waterways. WNRCD staff members are reaching out to horse owners of between one and ten horses, to participate in the manure composting program. Participants will receive compost bins and important manure composting information.

Small horse farms produce a significant quantity of manure; each day a mature horse can produce up to a cubic foot of manure. When horse manure is not managed properly it can leach nutrients and pathogens to surface and groundwater. Understandably, horse manure is often piled in easily accessible and convenient locations on the land. However, a horse owner may be unaware of how snow melt and rain may interact with the pile to cause polluted runoff to enter local waterways.

Through this program, the Winooski Conservation District will work with horse owners to identify suitable locations to store manure and to compost manure that are both environmentally friendly and convenient for the landowner. Composting manure allows soiled bedding material and animal waste to break down and create an extremely valuable input for the land. Composting manure can also improve water quality by preventing polluted runoff from entering water bodies.

Horse owners interested in participating in this program should contact Laura Dlugolecki for more information: laura@winooskinrcd.org or (802) 288-8155, x104.