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United Church of Colchester prepares for 25th annual Christmas Bazaar

A group of church women meet on Mondays to paint unique gift tins and stuff fabric Christmas trees. From left: Ardith Jones, Sherry Beane, Sally Stremlau and Hattie Saville take a short break from their work. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

A group of church women meet on Mondays to paint unique gift tins and stuff fabric Christmas trees. From left: Ardith Jones, Sherry Beane, Sally Stremlau and Hattie Saville take a short break from their work.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

The United Church of Colchester is preparing to open its doors again for the 25th annual Christmas Bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 14 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 pm. This familiar, historical red-brick Colchester landmark at 900 Main St. in the village was built in 1838. Its roots are both Congregational and Baptist, where the congregants have practiced their faith not only on Sundays but also through many community events and services. In 1990, an addition was constructed to connect the church with the Parish Hall, thus adding classrooms and other spaces.

The Baptist Church at the other end of the green was built in 1861 and was eventually sold to the town of Colchester for other town activities. It is now known as the Meeting House. In 1919, the congregations reunited and are still offering weekly church services, adult and children’s Sunday School plus hosting a variety of Colchester activities including concerts, recitals, meeting space for Colchester Community Chorus, the Colchester Quilters, the Champlain Valley Quilters workshops, and of course, the annual Christmas Bazaar. Proceeds from the bazaar go back into the community to support such efforts as the Colchester Food Shelf, Carenet, the Fold, Samaritan’s Purse, as well as providing emergency help to families and individuals in need.

This year, 19 local and church crafters present quality unique handmade products such as turned wood, tinsmithing, tole painting, quilting, knitting, crocheting, jewelry and much more. The offerings are not huge but diverse enough to provide you with an excellent chance to do all your Christmas shopping in one stop. The lunch alone has become quite famous for the selections of homemade soups, sandwiches and of course, a slice of pie for dessert. Lunch is served from 11 a.m. till 1:20 p.m. On your way out, you can visit the bake sale and stock up, buy raffle tickets for the colorful handmade queen-size quilt and other “raffles” donated by the craftspeople.

Colchester woman receives American Cancer Society award

Beth Bradley, center, receives the American Cancer Society Sunrise Award from Patty Cooper, left, American Cancer Society program manager for mission delivery and Peg Allen, retired Look Good Feel Better state coordinator. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Beth Bradley, center, receives the American Cancer Society Sunrise Award from Patty Cooper, left, American Cancer Society program manager for mission delivery and Peg Allen, retired Look Good Feel Better state coordinator.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

The American Cancer Society has announced that Beth Bradley of Colchester is a recipient of the 2015 Look Good Feel Better Sunrise Award for her work with the program in Chittenden County.

The award-winning volunteers are chosen from a field of candidates from across the country. Honors are presented each year to volunteer cosmetologists who have made extraordinary contributions to the program and the lives of the women they serve.

Bradley was selected for her professional attitude and innate compassion by freely providing hope and self-esteem to women coping with the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment.

”Beth has been dedicated to helping women with cancer for eight years,” said Patty Cooper, American Cancer Society program manager for mission delivery. “Her commitment to the program is extraordinary, as is she.”

The Look Good Feel Better program is made possible in the U.S. through a collaboration of the Personal Care Products Council Foundation, the American Cancer Society and the Professional Beauty Association. These three organizations have worked together for 26 years to improve the morale, confidence and quality of life for women during cancer treatment, offering a sense of normalcy and control during an often difficult and challenging time. Guided by volunteer licensed cosmetologists, female cancer patients who participate in the class learn how to use makeup and skin care techniques to overcome the appearance-related effects of chemotherapy and radiation.

For more information about the Look Good Feel Better program, to find a session near you or to volunteer, call the American Cancer Society at 800-227-2345 or visit www.cancer.org.